In The Land of Giants Part 2...

I dared not move..

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From my experience with Woodland Caribou the females are the nervous ones and are always on the watch for predators. If she gets spooked then game over. As I stood there in the middle of the barrens doing my best tree impression I slowly turned my head side to side scanning the barrens to try and spot any nearby Stags keeping tabs on her. Sure enough two males grazed along the side of a ridge to the right and behind her.

The first one I spotted was this male with a similar size rack as the first caribou I photographed earlier.

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But then I spotted the alpha of the group slowly making his way from out behind a bush.

It’s truly impressive that these animals can carry such large racks (and yes I know there are plenty of other images out there showing much large racks but hey I was impressed by this guy)

By now two females had circled around me to the right still trying to figure out what this odd looking tree was in their way. I dared not move and my attention was on the largest male so I wasted no time trying to photograph the females. As they made their way down towards the lake I made my way up to the ridge closer to the two male still feeding on lichen.

By the time I reach them they were on the move as they didn’t want to lose sight of their ladies.

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So for the next 30-45mins we walked side by side.

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It truly amazes me that these large mammals allow me to be in their presence at such close range with no fear. It can be unnerving at times when a large males pauses and starse at you as you stand in the open staring back at them.

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Caribou from my knowledge are not known to charge or attack humans but it is always in the back of my mind that if one did…boy I would be finished

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As the group headed down to the lakes edge I decided to head the other way and get that much need drink as by now the light was too harsh for anything good. Of my 8 years photographing Caribou this was by far the best experience I have ever had and I am so grateful to have been able to capture it and share it with all of you.